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  • #16
    4 Knm To Cape of Good Hope



    TRACKER


    Day 8. At 11 UTC Maserati Multi70 is sailing in the Indian Ocean, at 18°S and 82°E, at 30 knots speed reaching 40 knots peaks. Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70’s crew record a 730 miles advantage over Lionel Lemonchois’ previous record.

    “High speed for Maserati Multi70” says Sébastien Audigane, yesterday at around 14 UTC. “We are going between 25 and 30 knots, we’re extending the stride under the small gennaker. The night has just fallen on the Indian Ocean, there is no one, not even a boat. Only a few flying fishes trapped by the speed of Maserati Multi70 landed in bulk on the net. Tomorrow if we are lucky enough to get one, we could eat it like sushi.”



    Alex Pella adds: “It’s the 7th day of sailing and we already covered a good amount of miles in the Indian. We covered more than 600 miles in 24 hours, even though we were stuck under a huge thick cloud for more than 3 hours. We hope to keep this pace for the next 48 hours as well. The sky is clouded, the temperature inside the boat dropped a little, so we are able to sleep better – sleeping was almost impossible before, because of the heat and the condensation. Our next target is Cape of Good Hope, around 4000 miles ahead of us. It means a lot to us because of its name!”

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    • #17
      Lead Evaporates As Maserati Breaks Then Replaces Rudder



      “Unfortunately we hit something at 20 knots of speed and we lost the rudder under the right hull”, explains Giovanni Soldini, skipper of Maserati Multi70. “Luckily we have got one spare with us and it seems there are not too much collateral damage”.

      Soldini continues: “This morning we heard a great blow and we immediately realized that the rudder had broken. We get organized to remove the carbon axis that broke just at the exit of the hull, but the remaining piece came out dangerously and went sideways. Fortunately it seems that it did not cause serious damage. Once the axis was removed, we resumed on our route, without a rudder, heading to 230°, towards the center of the high pressure in front of us that will slow us down in the next 24, 36 hours. We will take advantage of these favourable weather conditions to install the new rudder. Then we will head full speed towards Cape Town”.



      The incident occurred today in the morning, at the beginning of the tenth day of navigation. Maserati Multi70 is located in the Indian Ocean about 3,000 miles from the Cape of Good Hope. Despite the damage, Giovanni Soldini and his crew (Guido Broggi, Sébastien Audigane, Oliver Herrera Perez and Alex Pella) continue to sail fast in the trade winds (around 25 knots average speed), 587 miles ahead of the record to beat.

      Started from Hong Kong on last January 18th, to beat the record set in 2008 by Lionel Lemonchois on board the 100 footer maxi catamaran Gitana 13 (41 days, 21 hours and 26 minutes), the 21.20 meters trimaran Maserati Multi70 must complete the 13000 nautical miles route and cut the finish line under the Queen Elisabeth II bridge over the River Thames before 1 March.


      *********************************





      Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70‘s crew have successfully completed the replacement of the starboard rudder which broke yesterday morning following a collision with an unidentified floating object. To be able to carry out this hard operation, they had to enter a zone of high pressure with little wind and a calm sea.

      “The assembly of the spare rudder went well“, explains Giovanni Soldini. “We managed to install it on the first try and we didn’t lose much time. Maserati Multi 70 is back at 100% and we are happy. Now, we are on our way to Cape Town.“




      In the coming days, the crew expects to face tough weather conditions. Soldini explains: “For the day 2 February we are waiting for the passage of a cold front associated with a depression that could be violent, with winds of 40 knots and more. We will try to position ourselves as well as possible to take favorable but not too strong winds.“

      At today’s ranking (13.32 UTC), beginning of the twelfth day of navigation, Maserati is about 2000 miles east of Cape of Good Hope.




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      • #18
        A Change In The Weather




        “It looks like the South”, says Sébastien Audigane at 14.50 UTC. “Maserati sails at 35° South and since this morning the albatrosses are there, the big ones, imperial, always majestic. They fly with other smaller albatrosses and brown plumage.”

        “Apart from the albatrosses, with Maserati we passed an empty tanker this morning and crossed a big cargo ship yesterday by night.”

        “It’s a little cold on board with that wind from South East, we pulled out boots and fleece jackets. The day started quite bumpy, broad reaching (110° twa) the wind veered and we’re getting down the waves under gennaker and j2.”

        “In about six hours we will jibe, heading west under the full moon.”






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        • #19
          Looks like they will get a nice window to pass the cape!

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          • #20



            +521 miles at 8:21 UTC this morning: Maserati Multi 70‘s advantage has grown again (120 miles earned in the last 12 hours) on Lionel Lemonchois, holder of the Hong Kong-London record. The trimaran is still rushing at more than 30 knots of average speed. The trimaran is sailing at 38°S of latitude and at 44°E of longitude (South of Madagascar). The Cape of Good Hope, a true turning point halfway through the route, is less than 1,200 miles away. “We think we will pass the Cape on February 2nd around 20/21 UTC”, explains Giovanni Soldini.







            The route to reach it is still very complex: “there is a first cold front to be negotiated in the next few hours” continues Giovanni Soldini explains: “we are cuurently sailing with a wind blowing from the north, crossbeam, and we’re heading west. We’re ahead of a cold front with 25/30 knots. In a few hours when we will be on the other side, we will find South, South Eastern winds.”

            Then, as anticipated by the same Soldini yesterday, a second cold front even more active is expected for 2 february around 6 am, when the trimaran will be near the coastline, above the continental shelf, where shoals might create a very difficult sea state.

            Baptized Cape of Storms by Bartolomeo Diaz, the first navigator to have reached it in 1487, ten years before Vasco de Gama, first one to have passed it during his voyage to India, Good Hope is fully justifying his reputation.





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            • #21
              48 Hours To Good Hope




              The second week of sailing of Maserati Multi70 ends at 800 miles from Cape of Good Hope with a 564 miles advantage on the roadmap of the record to beat. The Maserati Multi70’s crew is getting ready to face the last difficulty in this portion of the route: the crossing of a cold front associated with a deep depression positioned in the Roaring Forties.

              “Now we are passing through a hill of high pressure that has slowed us down. We’re sailing on port side with light winds from the east, heading to 240°. As soon as the wind will turn NE we will jibe”, explains Giovanni Soldini contacted by phone this morning. “We’ll try to get out of this front quickly. Therefore, it is important to position yourself fairly to the south, in order to leave the front with the best angle to head for South Africa.”

              “The problem with these fronts is that the wind can change in only ten minutes even with a 180 degrees rotation”, continues Soldini. “In this case, we are expecting winds from the North with gusts around 30/35 knots before the front then, once passed, it will blow from the South. But for many hours we will have the old swell from the North with the wind from the South, so it will be important to measure the speed to avoid damage.”

              At the end of the second week of navigation on the route of the record between Hong Kong and London, Maserati Multi70 has covered 5,756 of the 13,000 miles of the theoretical route (18.1 knots of average speed). In fact, on the ground, it covered 6,364 miles at 20 knots of average speed. During this second week in the Indian Ocean, between the seventh and eighth days, the best daily distance was recorded with 644 miles in 24 hours.

              There are still 6,944 miles to London.






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              • #22
                A Collision Of Forces




                38° 51’S, 27° 03’E: this is the position of Maserati Multi70 this morning at 8.00 UTC. With an advantage of 580 miles over the reference time, Giovanni Soldini and the crew of the trimaran are about 500 miles south-east of the Cape of Good Hope. A maritime region characterized by the meeting of two oceans (the Indian to the East and the Atlantic to the West) and by the clash of strong sea currents: the warm current of the Agulhas that goes down along the eastern coast of Africa and the cold oceanic one of Benguela that climbs the western coast of South African. Already responsible for the strong meteorological instability in the area, these currents and their vortices further complicate navigation.




                The crew passed through the cold front this morning around 8 UTC: “Now we are sailing with SW winds, about 25/30 knots”, explains Soldini. “The problems are the sea and the current: the swell comes from the North, a nice residual wind of the wind that we had. The current from North East collides against the wind blowing from South West. This happens around the continental shelf of South Africa and it might generate impossible sea state, so we tried to sail as far West as possible, in order to avoid the strongest zone of the current that raises walls against the waves from the South West”.

                Giovanni Soldini continues: “Now it is very important to go fast towards South Africa because behind this front will a high pressure is growing and it could block us for a few hours”.




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                • #23
                  Round Cape Of Good Hope And Floor It!





                  HONG KONG-LONDON / MASERATI MULTI 70 ROUNDED CAPE OF GOOD HOPE


                  After 16 days, 1 hour and 37 minutes of navigation, Maserati Multi 70 rounded Cape of Good Hope at 12.20 UTC.

                  After a night spent fighting with light winds, the landing on South Africa occurred a few hours earlier, at dawn, near Cape Agulhas, the southernmost tip of the African continent that by geographical agreement marks the limit between the Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean.

                  Just after they rounded Cape Agulhas, Giovanni Soldini and the other four crew members (Guido Broggi, Sébastien Audigane, Oliver Herrera Perez and Alex Pella) have found a favorable wind to round Good Hope, not just a symbolic turn halfway between Hong Kong and London.




                  “It’s a beautiful day, it’s sunny and windy. We are very happy to get here, over halfway, in sixteen days. Excellent average, excellent navigation, excellent boat, excellent crew. We hope to continue like this “, says Giovanni Soldini.





                  In 2008 Lionel Lemonchois and his crew, who currently hold the Hong Kong-London record, sailed for 21 days before passing Cape of Good Hope.

                  *******************************************




                  During the first day in the Atlantic, Maserati Multi 70 has sailed from the parallel 34° S (latitude of Cape of Good Hope) up to 28° S taking advantage of the southerly wind that will first turn to SE then to E as the trimaran continues to sail northwards in the “elevator for the Equator”.

                  Where to cross the ”Line” and its infamous calms or doldrums? This is the question of the moment as Giovanni Soldini explains: “It is very important to study well the strategy for the next few days. it is doubtful where the Equator shall be passed, usually we do it around longitude 27° W. But there is the possibility of going straight, near the African coast, but then things could get complicated the following week. Together with Pierre (Lasnier, the team’s routeur, Ed.) who helps us from land, we are running many simulations to try and decide the best choice. There are many options, unfortunately the meteorology is not an exact science, we’ll have to ponder well this choice because it is fundamental.”

                  “We will take a decision in the next 24/36 hours”, concludes Giovanni Soldini.

                  Maserati Multi 70 is 798 miles ahead at 9.00 UTC.




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                  • #24
                    1,358nm Advance On Tea Route Record!




                    This morning Maserati Multi 70 is sailing 250 miles off the coast of Namibia at 22° S, the latitude of Walvis Bay, whose lagoon is a worldwide famous spot for sailing speed records on flat waters.

                    Always with the wind astern, the crew had to make a couple of jibes to gain ground towards north. After the beautiful breezes of the last 48 hours, this morning, end of the eighteenth day of navigation, they had to pass through a lighter wind bubble.

                    At 8.48 UTC, Maserati Multi 70 is 2,000 miles from the Equator if it were to pass it at longitude 15° W, but 2.400 miles considering meridian 25° W. It’s always the same question: where to cross the doldrums zone?

                    The lead on the record holder has grown up to 1,200 miles.
                    Remember that Lionel Lemonchois had to stop 48 hours in Port Elisabeth before passing Good Hope, to let a winter depression pass.

                    There are less than 5,250 miles on the theoretical route.




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                    • #25
                      They just might make it!

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                      • #26
                        4444.0nm To Finish




                        Less than 4.500 nautical miles to the finish line for Maserati Multi 70: at 17.24 UTC ranking, the cartography marks 4.444 remaining miles until London, on the shortest theoretical route.

                        This is precisely the option of the shortest route that skipper Giovanni Soldini has decided to take to cross the Equator and its doldrums.

                        “For us onboard Maserati, the time has come to choose the route definitely”, explains Giovanni Soldini this morning. ” We had two options. The first one was to pass the Equator where we always do it, it means between 30° and 27° W of longitude.” So closer to Brazil than to the African continent. ”The other option we have seen in these days”, continues Soldini, ”is the possibility of following a route much closer to African coastline. All the models agree, at the end we’ll play it and we’ll follow this unusual route that I’ve never done before but should work well.” Crossing the Equator at around 10° of longitude and then continuing towards Guinea will make save a lot of miles compared to the western usual choice, but it is not just a shortcut as Giovanni explains: ”We may gain at least 24/36 hours on this option that will get us out of the Senegal with a better angle in the north-eastern trade winds, to go then towards the Azores, turn the high pressure and take a front for England.”




                        Maserati Multi 70 sails off the coast of Angola, at 07 ° S of latitude, always with light southern winds and with a 1,7229 miles advantage on the record, after 20 days of navigation.




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                        • #27
                          Laundry, Pasta Abd A Fast Approaching Equator




                          After a brief slowdown this morning at dawn, Maserati Multi 70 is back again at full speed on its route towards the West African coast at more than 28 knots of speed in a South wind blowing between 14 and 17 knots.

                          A morning break that allowed the trimaran’s crew to take care of the clothing as told Soldini: ”It’s laundry day, we washed our shirts with sea water then rinsed with a little fresh water (produced on board with the watermaker, Ed.). Today the wind should come back and get more stabilized, now we have 8, 9 knots. We shall be patient”. Patience rewarded: the wind has arrived a few hours later.




                          This morning at the 8:30 UTC rankings, Maserati Multi 70 is 1813 miles ahead of the record holder. The equator is less than 600 nautical miles away, 4254 until the finish line.









                          TRACKER
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                          • #28
                            Probably a good thing to get some laundry done.

                            Next report might have content on amputated fingers?

                            Someone send them a can opener!

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                            • #29
                              Across the equator with a 2,000nm lead!

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                              • #30
                                Equator Crossed Maserati Extends Lead




                                Maserati Multi 70 is back in the northern hemisphere after crossing the Equator at longitude 5°W today at 10.28 UTC after 21 days, 13 hours and 15 minutes. It’s an important moment for the skipper Giovanni Soldini and the other four crew members (Guido Broggi, Sébastien Audigane, Oliver Herrera Perez and Alex Pella) as Soldini explains: “We’ve passed the Equator. To get there after only 21 days from Hong Kong and six days from Cape of Good Hope is a pretty good time. We are happy, our eastern option, I mean our choice to navigate near the African coast, has paid off. We have a good wind and we maintain good speeds. Now we are thinking about the northern hemisphere, it is the last part of the course; it is also the most difficult because we will arrive in winter. We must get ready”.

                                From its current position, Maserati Multi 70 will have to continue its route towards NW continuing along the coasts of West Africa before entering the north-eastern trade winds that look stable in strength and direction starting from latitude 10°N.
                                After that, the crew will have to decide the route up to Europe and it will depend on the location of the Azores high and the trajectories of the winter depressions that sweep the North Atlantic at our latitudes.

                                At 11.20 UTC rankings, the advantage of Maserati Multi 70 on the record holder’s roadmap is 2.009 miles, missing 3.630 miles until the finish line. After three weeks and one day of navigation, Maserati Multi 70 has travelled 9.033 nm of the 13,000 miles of the theoretical route (average speed of 17,5 knots), actually it has already exceeded 10.186 miles sailed at an average speed of 19,7 knots.
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