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  • Photoboy
    replied
    4 Knm To Cape of Good Hope



    TRACKER


    Day 8. At 11 UTC Maserati Multi70 is sailing in the Indian Ocean, at 18°S and 82°E, at 30 knots speed reaching 40 knots peaks. Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70’s crew record a 730 miles advantage over Lionel Lemonchois’ previous record.

    “High speed for Maserati Multi70” says Sébastien Audigane, yesterday at around 14 UTC. “We are going between 25 and 30 knots, we’re extending the stride under the small gennaker. The night has just fallen on the Indian Ocean, there is no one, not even a boat. Only a few flying fishes trapped by the speed of Maserati Multi70 landed in bulk on the net. Tomorrow if we are lucky enough to get one, we could eat it like sushi.”



    Alex Pella adds: “It’s the 7th day of sailing and we already covered a good amount of miles in the Indian. We covered more than 600 miles in 24 hours, even though we were stuck under a huge thick cloud for more than 3 hours. We hope to keep this pace for the next 48 hours as well. The sky is clouded, the temperature inside the boat dropped a little, so we are able to sleep better – sleeping was almost impossible before, because of the heat and the condensation. Our next target is Cape of Good Hope, around 4000 miles ahead of us. It means a lot to us because of its name!”

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  • Photoboy
    replied



    Day 7. After a week of sailing and 2570 miles traveled, the lead on the previous record rises to 741 miles.

    For Giovanni Soldini and the crew of Maserati Multi70 the second week of the record between Hong Kong and London begins in the Indian Ocean, under the 15th parallel South.

    At this morning ranking, 7:06 UTC, the trimaran Maserati Multi70 recorded average speeds around 30 knots and a distance of 4,000 miles from Good Hope, next buoy on the Hong Kong to London route.

    “The first week went very well”, says Giovanni Soldini, “we have found a good harmony on board. We sailed well and we also had Neptune on our side. We entered the trade winds last night around 18 UTC and we immediately accelerated. We spent the last day between brutal gales and gennaker maneuvers, but we are happy because we are going fast and I think that in the coming days we can make a long way.”





    http://maserati.soldini.it/cartography/

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  • Dutch Rudder
    replied
    Membership in the Record Obscura Club?

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  • Rainier
    replied
    I really, really, really don't get the point to this one. What a boring record to set. Big egos and big toys I guess....

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  • Photoboy
    replied
    Trucking Across The India Ocean




    Tracker


    After crossing the Sunda Strait, Maserati Multi70 was welcomed in the Indian Ocean by a powerful NW wind, that the trimaran took crosswind, on starboard. The crew sailed the first 450 miles in the ocean like that, slightly below the direct route to South Africa. Now the trimaran is about to cross the heart of a low pressure zone with light winds – this is the last obstacle before reaching the SE trade winds zone.

    Reporting Sebastién Audigane’s words: “We are again under gennaker after a wet and quite fast night. Some birds fly over our head. They are a kind of northern gannet, similar to albatrosses. They play with Maserati Multi70 in front of the forestay, then just above the water surface, in front of the bow or in pairs crossing diagonally in front of us. In few words, the trimaran is the attraction of the day for the Indian’s local population.

    Giovanni Soldini adds: “Since this morning we are crossing a lot of tropical squalls, so we took the opportunity to do some cleaning on board. We are satisfied.”



    We are on the fifth day on Maserati Multi70, we have passed the Straits of the Sonda




    On board the Maserati Multi70 you eat very well! Here is the first typical recipe

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  • Photoboy
    replied
    Squeezing Past Sumatra

    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70‘s Team are less than 300 nautical miles away from the Sunda Strait. After four days, they sailed 1635 nm at an average speed of 18,9 knots and gained a 468 miles lead over the previous record.



    Maserati Multi70 is now located between the islands of Borneo to the West and Sumatra to the East.

    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70‘s crew crossed the Equator this morning at 3:13 am UTC. Then, in order to stay in the pressure, we had to keep on jibing towards the Sunda Strait where we should arrive in about 15 hours (around 22 UTC on January 22nd)” explains Giovanni Soldini. “Then, after the Strait, we will have to see how we will manage to catch the South East trade winds in the Indian Ocean.”



    TRACKER

    Alex Pella explains: “Navigation aboard Maserati Multi70 is going on in this incredible sea of China. It is a real slalom between islands, reefs, atolls, merchant ships and fishing vessels not always well marked. It’s fun from the point of view of pure navigation but it’s not always easy. We have still two difficult passages to do before entering the Indian Ocean. We crossed the Equator last night and we are going on with super conditions, stable wind from the north, flat sea and summer heat.”




    After three days of sailing Maserati Multi70 is about 580 miles from the Sunda Strait, the gate between Java and Sumatra to get into the Indian Ocean. Sailing across the South China Sea and the Java Sea is like a slalom between coral islands in a zone where nautical traffic is quite intense. Moreover, in this part of the route there’s the difficult crossing of the Equator, where the weather conditions are very unstable.

    “We are in an area where the wind is weak” says Giovanni Soldini, “the wind goes from 7 to 9 knots from 30° turning to North: we only have to wait for the right moment to gybe and run away towards South-West. The high pressure zone is East of us, we have to enter in it port tack, look for the wind rotation to North and then get out starboard tack.”


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  • Cassidy
    replied
    Mmmmmmm pigs feet.

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  • Photoboy
    replied
    Lentils, Pigs Feet and a 300 NM Advance On Maserati Menu!





    First day of sailing with good weather conditions, the crew’s mood is very high.

    After a tack towards Vietnam to take advantage of the wind’s acceleration near the coast, Maserati Multi70 is back at port tack going South.

    30 hours after the start, Giovanni Soldini explains from aboard the weather conditions that the trimaran will encounter in the next days.

    “The ships and fishing boats’ traffic is always very intense, in a few hours we should gybe again to get more Ovest. The wind gets faster near Vietnam’s coasts but there are high risks for the navigation over there. We will have to compromise and try to keep a fair distance from the coast in order to avoid the majority of the local shipping boats.”

    “Tomorrow the wind should be stable around 15/20 knots turning more East, parallel to the coast, then at the end of the day it should get slower. We are expecting a high pressure bubble at 5° North and 107° East for the 21st, that passage will be crucial in order to understand when and how we will reach the Sunda Strait. The 21st and the 22nd will be difficult days. We will have to enjoy this nice wind pushing us fast towards South for now!”

    “Tonight we will have a nice dinner with lentils and pig’s trotter, non very equatorial but effective.”





    TRACKER

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  • Flat Stanley
    replied
    Good luck to the Maserati crew!

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  • Photoboy
    replied
    Maserati Jumps To Early Advantage In Tea Route Record Attempt




    The trimaran Maserati Multi70 left Hong Kong crossing the starting line positioned between the Tai Long Pai and Nga Ying Pal lights, at the exit of the Tathoong canal, at 10: 43′ 23” UTC (18:43 in China, 11:43 in Italy).

    To beat the record Giovanni Soldini and the crew of the trimaran – Guido Broggi, Oliver Herrera Perez, Alex Pella and Sébastien Audigane – have to complete the course and cross the finish line under the Queen Elizabeth II bridge over the Thames before the 1st of March at 8: 9′ 47” UTC.




    Along the 13,000 miles course (about 24,000 kilometers) following the shortest orthododromic route passing by the Cape of Good Hope, the Hong Kong-London route begins with a run down the South China Sea. “The weather situation has been very unstable in these last days”, explains Pierre Lasnier, the routeur who will follow the record on land. “According to the latest models, it’s getting clearer. Starting today, Maserati Multi70 is almost certain to find an average wind of NE between 17 and 18 knots of speed for the next three days, enough to get down to 5°N, under the southern point of Vietnam. But, they will not be able to sail on the direct route, they will have to make several gybes downwind to go towards South.”




    “Finally we are off “, says Giovanni Soldini. “It was a tough decision to make because the weather situation is not ideal but we do not see any other useful windows in the coming days. From the technical point of view, at the moment at the Equator there is a bubble with no wind that we will have to cross. We hope that the conditions change once we’ll get there and be kind to us. During the first days we will do our best to stay in deep water, but there is more wind near the vietnamese coasts, so we will try to find compromises between the need to go fast and the attention to pay at the myriad of networks and boats of local fishermen who do not even have navigation lights. The boat is ready, we are motivated and we will always try to give our best. ”

    The same enthusiasm and desire to navigate in the words of the Spanish Alex Pella: “We are all super happy and motivated, the stand-by periods are always complicated and stressful, especially in Hong Kong, far from home. Now we’re going to do our best!”




    TRACKER

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  • Photoboy
    replied
    Maserati Multi 70 Rumbling In The Starting Blocks



    No chance to start the record Hong Kong-London in the next 48 hours for Giovanni Soldini and the Maserati Multi70 crew (Guido Broggi, Oliver Herrera Perez, Alex Pella and Sébastien Audigane): this is the conclusion of today’s conversation between the skipper Soldini and Pierre Lasnier, the team’s routeur, after studying the latest weather forecast.

    “Starting with the current models, we would have wind at the beginning, during the first days, but we risk to loose a lot of time in the calms over the Sunda Strait”, explains Soldini. “We are evaluating the possibility of a departure between 6 pm on Wednesday 17 and 6 am on Thursday 18 (UTC time) this week. For now it does not look like an ideal weather window but according to the latest forecasts, we should find more favorable conditions to overcome the first part of the route up to the Sunda Strait.”

    Maserati Multi70 remains moored at the dock of the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club where the crew is still waiting for the piece to be replaced on the mast which should arrived tomorrow.

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  • Prince of Whales
    replied
    I wonder if Giovanni has a winning lottery ticket in that 1st frame?

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  • Photoboy
    replied
    Getting Ship Shape For Tea Route Record Attempt




    Maserati Multi70 is moored in Hong Kong’s harbour waiting to sail off for the Tea Route record from Hong Kong to London.

    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70’s Team finished all the last touches before the navigation, they set up the new kitchen, got the pantry ready and they conducted some sea trials.

    Now the crew is in stand-by, they are examining the weather conditions to identify the best time window to set sail.


























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  • Photoboy
    replied
    Charging Up For A Tea Route Record Run!

    Maserati Multi 70 in final preparations for her quest for the Tea Route Record applies
    solar panels in Hong Kong:



    New photovoltaic panels for Maserati Multi 70!
    We just installed twice as much Solbian panels as they were before for the Hong Kong-London record.
    This will allow us to reduce weight on board and to be energetically autonomous, which is a fundamental aspect in long routes like this one.













    Hong Kong - London is a historic and epic course, which is why we decided to launch ourselves into this great adventure.

    Retracing the of the Victorian era is fascinating. On these crossings, there were the first developments to make boats faster and more efficient,
    the origins of the yacht design, because arriving first in London meant selling tea at triple price.




    "The tea route from China to London does have a racing history. The vessels weren't racing for glory, though, they were racing for profit. The first ship to land in London with a load of tea could demand the best price, and this is what pushed the design of the first tea clippers, as British companies tried to compete with faster, smaller American clipper ships. The ponderously slow merchantmen ships were no match for the most advanced technology of the 19th century, and the svelte, fast boats could carry precious cargo to market while the demand was still high, and the supply was still low. Clippers gave way to the massive Windjammers within a few decades, and the glory days when (legal) cargo vessels were sleek and speedy was relatively brief, but incredibly important to the evolution of modern sailing yachts."


    41d 21h 26m 34s is the current record, set by Gitana XII back 2008

    Additional Reading!

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  • Panama Red
    replied
    Boy, If you look at the damage in the 2,200 nm Transpac they encountered, just think of the possibilities of a 13,000 nm voyage!

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