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  • A Nice Day For A Spanking



    If you didn't get beat up in over the past several weeks of big SF Breezes, today certainly got you all caught up with the beat down you have been missing...Most events called it early today as the sailors and RC had their hands full...

    Full reports to follow...

























    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  • #2
    Wow! Expresses are doing death rolls, live!!
    Heard that Bob on the C39 bailed early in the SHF. I've been monitoring winds outside, which have been fairly mellow. Hope all is well for my mates offshore.

    Comment


    • #3
      My guess is the guy smiling in the first picture (red cat) is not the owner (aka 'checkbook').

      I hope everyone got back from SSS Farallones with all their parts mostly intact.

      Comment


      • #4
        yea it is
        Richard Vilvens
        Brand Ambassador
        PSA Capricorn USA
        F-18 5150
        http://www.capricornsailing.com/
        http://www.sailblogs.com/member/capricornusa/
        R.Vilvens@yahoo.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Yep I bagged it early on the SHF, along with half a dozen others. Just past Bonita it was blowing 25-30, and I just didn't have it in me. Been sick with some damn bug or other, thought I was past it enough, but a few tacks out there did me in.

          Looks like if I had been able to carry on for a few more miles it would have gotten nice. Lightship was showing 15-20 a couple hours later. Dang. But the way I was feeling at 10, just didn't seem doable this year.

          bw

          Comment


          • #6
            My boat, and I was not smiling. But nobody was hurt and we managed 27kts before dropping the rig, so it could have been worse.

            Originally posted by Andy Newell View Post
            My guess is the guy smiling in the first picture (red cat) is not the owner (aka 'checkbook').

            I hope everyone got back from SSS Farallones with all their parts mostly intact.

            Comment


            • #7
              SH Farallones

              Between the bridge and Lands End, for the first time I can recall I took a big wave into the cockpit from the lee side. After that I kept telling myself it was getting a little more comfortable, and I believed myself. But the autopilot wouldn't hold a course, the spare didn't power up, and I didn't relish the idea of spending 8 more hours tied to the helm. So I bailed too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Where did the great shot of Wile E. Coyote go? Express 27 #11, posted yesterday afternoon. Breeze on!

                Comment


                • #9




                  StFYC Phyllis Kleinman Swiftsure Regatta – Day 1

                  Gradient Vee, Marstrom M32

                  Race Report



                  We dropped the rig of my Marstrom M32 while approaching the weather mark during race 2 of the StFYC Phyllis Kleinman Swiftsure regatta today. Nobody was hurt save for a couple little carbon splinters, but still, what a bummer.



                  This morning I checked a couple weather forecasts and so we were expecting wind, but we got a little more than expected. Boats with instruments in the area where our mast came down reported seeing gusts in the high-twenties to low-thirties. That would generally be stay-on-the-dock or head-for-the-dock conditions for us, but the strong flood today was keeping the water pretty much flat and we were staying mostly in control. A couple sketchy stuffs off the wind, but not the worst we’ve had. Upwind our biggest problem (before losing the mast) was getting through our tacks without ending up in irons. This issue was a combination of having our mast raked too far back, my amateur driving, and a little bit of crew timing since we hadn’t all sailed together previously. Top speed for the day was 27kts, so we were definitely lit up at times.





                  Race 1 we missed the start by 10-15 minutes or so. This was a little irritating to be honest. The warning gun was at 11am, but the skippers meeting was at 10am. In hindsight, how was that supposed to work? It must have been at least 10:15am by the time I was back at the boat. It took another 10-15 minutes for the J105s docked behind us to clear out. It took us 10 minutes to get off the dock and tow out. Then 5 minutes to get the main up and a reef tied in. Our crew of Chad Freitas, Andrew Hura, Dan Roberts and my brother Robbie was as solid as it gets, but we hadn’t all sailed together as a team so there was no way we were going to race in 20kts+ without doing a couple tacks, a gennaker deploy, a couple gybes, and a takedown. There was also no way we were going to make the start in time. Oh well. We ended up starting race 1 with the J105s and following X40 Smart Recruiters around, not realizing that they had already called it quits and weren’t even racing. Scored a DNF.



                  Race 2 we had a decent start. Hit the line at full speed, near the boat end, with the Mod70 Orion powering through to leeward of us. What a beast! As we were approaching the line and it was just Orion and us I had this thought of, “Gee, wouldn’t it suck if Orion hooked us and took us up right now.” Fortunately they didn’t. I’m sure they had their hands plenty full blasting through our lee with two hulls flying. What an impressive site.





                  We sailed a clean first leg and seemed to finally be getting our tacks sorted out. We kept Orion within site so we must have been kicking ass. It sure felt that way at least. Gusts were hitting us hard when we approached shore, but we were managing. We over stood the windward mark a bit, but that was fine considering the 4kt flood and the cost of doing two more tacks if we missed it. The water was flat and while it was definitely windy, it didn’t feel like the high-twenties, low-thirties gusts that the boats around us reported.





                  If I remember right, at this point it was about 12:20pm and we were basically reaching down to the mark on Port tack and just about heading for the offset. We were definitely moving along, but things did not feel particularly loaded at that moment. The traveler was being cheated down and we were not hiking as we were getting ready for the bear-away and deploy. Then BANG! Then SPLASH as the weather hull comes down to the water, and splash again as the rig hits the water.

                  Nobody was hurt. And while there were other boats around, at that instant nobody was to leeward of us. A J120 did have to think fast and maneuver to avoid our rig floating in the water. I hope they still made the mark. Sorry guys!







                  My crew was cool and calm and stayed that way. As soon we knew everyone was fine we just got to work de-rigging and pulling everything out of the water while we drifted with the 4kt flood. We managed to haul everything back onto the boat quickly except for one cotter pin that I lost. We tied the mast down to the starboard rack and accepted a tow back into StFYC from Dick Watts. Thank you!



                  I’m not totally clear on what happened to cause the failure. The rig is busted all over the place. It snapped about 6ft above the base with a big peel up from there. There are cracks around the splice area. The hounds fitting pulled down through the mast section for a distance. Two of the carbon diamond stays are snapped. The spreader attachment points are bent. The spreaders are damaged. Plus the mainsail is torn and the rig came down so hard on the Starboard hiking rack that it managed to damage that too. Fortunately the guys acted quickly and kept the rig in the water from banging into the hulls so no apparent hull damage.







                  My theory is that the lower leeward carbon diamond stay failed. I think this caused the bottom mast section to buckle to leeward and everything else happened as the rig was coming down or while it was in the water.



                  I am disappointed that this happened and happened so early in the season. In hindsight, perhaps SmartRecruiters and Shadow were a lot smarter than us for bugging out given the conditions. I was looking forward to the Ditch Run in two weeks and matching up with LiftOff (M32 visiting from Newport) and SmartRecruiters again. I thought we had a chance at the record if conditions were right.



                  Now the focus shifts to getting a new rig and being ready for the late season events and Rolex Big Boat Series.



                  Randy Miller


                  Results
                  " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



                  h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by #13 View Post
                    Where did the great shot of Wile E. Coyote go? Express 27 #11, posted yesterday afternoon. Breeze on!


                    I think you saw it on the vast wasteland that is FB...
                    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



                    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Andy Newell View Post
                      My guess is the guy smiling in the first picture (red cat) is not the owner (aka 'checkbook').

                      I hope everyone got back from SSS Farallones with all their parts mostly intact.
                      I'm thinking that grin was one of those,"Holy shit! What a rush! NOBODY got hurt!", things...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Photoboy View Post




                        StFYC Phyllis Kleinman Swiftsure Regatta – Day 1

                        Gradient Vee, Marstrom M32

                        Race Report



                        We dropped the rig of my Marstrom M32 while approaching the weather mark during race 2 of the StFYC Phyllis Kleinman Swiftsure regatta today. Nobody was hurt save for a couple little carbon splinters, but still, what a bummer.



                        This morning I checked a couple weather forecasts and so we were expecting wind, but we got a little more than expected. Boats with instruments in the area where our mast came down reported seeing gusts in the high-twenties to low-thirties. That would generally be stay-on-the-dock or head-for-the-dock conditions for us, but the strong flood today was keeping the water pretty much flat and we were staying mostly in control. A couple sketchy stuffs off the wind, but not the worst we’ve had. Upwind our biggest problem (before losing the mast) was getting through our tacks without ending up in irons. This issue was a combination of having our mast raked too far back, my amateur driving, and a little bit of crew timing since we hadn’t all sailed together previously. Top speed for the day was 27kts, so we were definitely lit up at times.





                        Race 1 we missed the start by 10-15 minutes or so. This was a little irritating to be honest. The warning gun was at 11am, but the skippers meeting was at 10am. In hindsight, how was that supposed to work? It must have been at least 10:15am by the time I was back at the boat. It took another 10-15 minutes for the J105s docked behind us to clear out. It took us 10 minutes to get off the dock and tow out. Then 5 minutes to get the main up and a reef tied in. Our crew of Chad Freitas, Andrew Hura, Dan Roberts and my brother Robbie was as solid as it gets, but we hadn’t all sailed together as a team so there was no way we were going to race in 20kts+ without doing a couple tacks, a gennaker deploy, a couple gybes, and a takedown. There was also no way we were going to make the start in time. Oh well. We ended up starting race 1 with the J105s and following X40 Smart Recruiters around, not realizing that they had already called it quits and weren’t even racing. Scored a DNF.



                        Race 2 we had a decent start. Hit the line at full speed, near the boat end, with the Mod70 Orion powering through to leeward of us. What a beast! As we were approaching the line and it was just Orion and us I had this thought of, “Gee, wouldn’t it suck if Orion hooked us and took us up right now.” Fortunately they didn’t. I’m sure they had their hands plenty full blasting through our lee with two hulls flying. What an impressive site.





                        We sailed a clean first leg and seemed to finally be getting our tacks sorted out. We kept Orion within site so we must have been kicking ass. It sure felt that way at least. Gusts were hitting us hard when we approached shore, but we were managing. We over stood the windward mark a bit, but that was fine considering the 4kt flood and the cost of doing two more tacks if we missed it. The water was flat and while it was definitely windy, it didn’t feel like the high-twenties, low-thirties gusts that the boats around us reported.





                        If I remember right, at this point it was about 12:20pm and we were basically reaching down to the mark on Port tack and just about heading for the offset. We were definitely moving along, but things did not feel particularly loaded at that moment. The traveler was being cheated down and we were not hiking as we were getting ready for the bear-away and deploy. Then BANG! Then SPLASH as the weather hull comes down to the water, and splash again as the rig hits the water.

                        Nobody was hurt. And while there were other boats around, at that instant nobody was to leeward of us. A J120 did have to think fast and maneuver to avoid our rig floating in the water. I hope they still made the mark. Sorry guys!







                        My crew was cool and calm and stayed that way. As soon we knew everyone was fine we just got to work de-rigging and pulling everything out of the water while we drifted with the 4kt flood. We managed to haul everything back onto the boat quickly except for one cotter pin that I lost. We tied the mast down to the starboard rack and accepted a tow back into StFYC from Dick Watts. Thank you!



                        I’m not totally clear on what happened to cause the failure. The rig is busted all over the place. It snapped about 6ft above the base with a big peel up from there. There are cracks around the splice area. The hounds fitting pulled down through the mast section for a distance. Two of the carbon diamond stays are snapped. The spreader attachment points are bent. The spreaders are damaged. Plus the mainsail is torn and the rig came down so hard on the Starboard hiking rack that it managed to damage that too. Fortunately the guys acted quickly and kept the rig in the water from banging into the hulls so no apparent hull damage.







                        My theory is that the lower leeward carbon diamond stay failed. I think this caused the bottom mast section to buckle to leeward and everything else happened as the rig was coming down or while it was in the water.



                        I am disappointed that this happened and happened so early in the season. In hindsight, perhaps SmartRecruiters and Shadow were a lot smarter than us for bugging out given the conditions. I was looking forward to the Ditch Run in two weeks and matching up with LiftOff (M32 visiting from Newport) and SmartRecruiters again. I thought we had a chance at the record if conditions were right.



                        Now the focus shifts to getting a new rig and being ready for the late season events and Rolex Big Boat Series.



                        Randy Miller


                        Results
                        Nice report Randy.

                        Bummer about the stick, glad nobody got hurt.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yup, that's it. Looking good! Beep-beep!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RandyM View Post
                            My boat, and I was not smiling. But nobody was hurt and we managed 27kts before dropping the rig, so it could have been worse.
                            I wish you the best in getting a new rig fitted. You took it in stride and much better than I might have. A rig failure in my 30+ year old Santana 35 would be either a season ending or career ending injury depending on the insurance company.

                            Comment


                            • #15







                              The Completed Gallery
                              Last edited by Photoboy; 05-20-2014, 12:44 PM.
                              " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



                              h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

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