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2018 OYRA Duxship

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  • Prince of Whales
    replied
    I'm told one of the boats is a new owner and not completely familiar with the nuances, and was training for Pac Cup.

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  • Honey Badger
    replied
    Can't we all just get along?

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  • Carl Spackler
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlie Tuna View Post
    The retired boat, no doubt owes the RC and apology. And maybe a case of wine.

    The boat that did not compete should not be hanged until the witch test is conducted.

    IMHO

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  • Charlie Tuna
    replied
    The retired boat, no doubt owes the RC and apology. And maybe a case of wine.

    The boat that did not compete should not be hanged until the witch test is conducted.

    IMHO

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  • psycho tiller
    replied
    I don't want to speak for those involved but at the same time things tend to take on a life of their own on these here inter-web thingy's with wild rumors running amok so I feel somewhat compelled to offer up what I know about the situation. The good news is there were no real catastrophes that I'm aware of, just a lot of miscommunication. As an objective observer I can understand not only how some of the miscommunication came to be from the boats but also completely understand why RC was pulling their hair out in both concern and frustration especially given the conditions of the race.

    I wasn't directly involved but from what I've gathered I think one boat was late to the start so just ran part of the course and never crossed the start line but along next to it. Understandably, RC saw them and even though they were late and didn't go across the start line still felt obligated to keep track of them although I think the boat involved had no idea RC was tracking them. I think there was some miscommunication when they headed back in and didn't notify RC they were back in the bay. I believe another boat didn't notify RC when they retired. I hope I'm not giving out false info and if so I hope others can provide clarity and correction to what I'm assuming I know. Isn't there some saying about assuming? 'Don't assume, it just makes an....

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  • Wylieguy
    replied
    Another thought here. EVERY ocean racing Race Committee makes a note of boats not registered that "APPEAR" to be starting a race. Sail #, boat type, apparent # of souls on board, color, etc. This takes attention away from the official starters to check on whether the boat is headed for the bridge -- or whether it's just happened by, or taking pictures, or waving goodbye, but not going out. On an ocean race day, if a boat calls the Coast Guard from beyond Lands End with a distress call, the CG will contact the Race Deck to check and see if it's a racing boat. I know Race Officers "shouldn't care," but they do. It not at all unusual for boats to "accompany" a race. Happens all the time. Sometimes those boats check in to say they're going, sometimes not. It's a good idea to check in, and if a boat does, it needs to check back in when it returns. I suppose there's no legal/insurance requirement, but it's good, safe ocean sailing practice. -- Pat

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  • IOR Geezer
    replied
    Today's radios have the scan option, I believe 16 is automatically included.

    Still not clear what the offending persons failed to do, if they had not officially started, they may have assumed they had not done anything wrong.

    And big thanks to Pat for his years of service as well.

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  • Prince of Whales
    replied
    It's a difficult, often thankless position.

    Thanks for you years of service!

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  • Wylieguy
    replied
    Some may recall that I served 2 terms as YRA Chairman a few years ago. I have also served on many OYRA/SSS Race Committees and as PRO on OYRA races in the past.

    But first a little history. When I first began crewing on ocean racing boats in the early 1970s, the attitude was, "Pack an extra sandwich and a second six pack and let's go ocean racing." You could dodge into the GGYC or StFYC on the morning of the race, fill out an entry form, pay your fee, and get out to the start line before the gun. The total safety requirements were the Coast Guard minimum. Period. VHF radios used crystals, so many boats only had Channels 16, 22, one or two boat-to-boat channels, and the marine operator. We sometimes used the marine operator to call in because that antenna was higher than the the yacht clubs' and we could get through - for a fee.

    And the races were much longer, sometimes lasting into early Sunday morning or even later, depending on conditions. Boats just sailed out the Gate and vanished until sailing back under. I served on OYRA Race Committees in that era and we'd bring sleeping gear so we could stand watches while waiting for "Sunday boats" to finish. The WWII search light at the old StFYC could actually light up Fort Point and we'd use it when we thought we could see a boat coming in. Several times when boats did not finish I visited marinas to check to see if the boat was in its berth before calling back to the race deck to confirm it was safely tied up - after finding a pay phone to make the call. Although an emergency phone number was on the entry, it was often someone else on the same boat or a distant relative in another state who didn't even know a race was going on.

    Thinking back, I wonder what I was thinking and what kind of liability I potentially faced. I don't know what kind of insurance there was, if any. This was before the USSA Race Officer Program.

    Now, my YRA Chairman Experience:

    It was my unfortunate duty as YRA Chairman to participate in 2 Coast Guard hearings involving ocean racing fatalities. Neither was a OYRA race, but it is the YRA that arranges all Marine Event Permits for racing activities with the Coast Guard, and YRA is the organization they call first when something bad happens. The Port Captain, Safety Officer, SAR Officer, Permit Officer, and others sat on one side of the table. Laura Paul (Executive Secretary - and our CG contact person), myself, the then-OYRA President, the race PRO, and once a hosting yacht club officer (more on this below) sat on the other. It was pretty much a one-way conversation in each instance. It's really (and I mean really, really) hard sit there when racers have died.

    Each hearing resulted in Coast Guard recommendations and OYRA safety regulation changes. These included a revised and clearly written set of safety instructions., which have been refined by OYRA President Andy Newell and the OYRA Board; increased safety required equipment aboard ocean racing boats; improved communication requirements including EPIRB/PLBs; radio monitoring; check ins; Safety at Sea training requirements; and more.

    And each incident resulted in increased Coast Guard participation. Perhaps some might recall being accompanied by a Coast Guard cutter on an ocean race or two? Before, ocean permits were issued for the season; now they are issued prior to each race - after the crew lists are completed. The Coast Guard wants to know how many potential rescues it needs to plan for. A large boat with a dozen crew might require multiple helicopters for a rescue, for instance. They want to know who is on the boat, how to contact emergency phone numbers, and want to be updated on where boats are during the race.

    This applies to all ocean races leaving San Francisco Bay - SSS, BAMA, OYRA, Coastal Cup, PacCup, Santa Cruz, Monterey, and so on. The Coast Guard issues Marine Permits based on requirements established by the race authority (organization) and expects the rules to be followed - and enforced.

    And they want to be informed if a boat is overdue. Overdue can be missing a required call in after dark or when all the other boats have finished and one is missing. When they are called, they assume the worst. Emergency contacts are called and the CG begins to prepare for a search and rescue mission. Their helicopter crews down the peninsula need to be alerted and the helicopters warmed up. The small boat/cutter crews need to be assembled. They don't wait until an emergency is declared; they begin begin at the first alert. And they're not happy to spend all these assets for false alarms.

    Now about yacht clubs. OYRA SSS, BAMA, and other races almost all depend on two yacht club race decks. There have been several times when those two yacht clubs decided it was too risky to allow ocean races to be run from their facilities (note when a yacht club officer attended a Coast Guard hearing and discovered how unprepared OYRA was set that time). Old timers might remember BAMA races being run from boats or an RV in the parking lot following the Farallones Race involving multiple fatalities. One club decided to avoid OYRA races following a more recent incident for a short time --something that might not be so well known. Safety is everyone's concern; liability is the yacht club board's concern. We don't know how many millions of dollars were involved in the most recent multiple fatality incident.

    And now a personal comment:

    I think boats that decide to not comply with OYRA requirements should be disqualified from ocean racing. Period! Racing in the Gulf of the Farallones and beyond can be dangerous. There have been multiple fatalities since I began racing and managing races in 1972. I love ocean racing - that why at 78 years old I'm still out there, and I don't want some jerk making that more difficult or even impossible.

    I think everyone on every boat ought to thank the volunteers who organize and run our races. At one point YRA was able to hold a banquet for this.

    I agree with Jeff. Running an ocean race begins days before the actual race and can extend into days following, especially if there's an incident involving loss of life. The folks on the Race Deck care about us. Don't make it more difficult for them.

    Pat Broderick
    Former YRA Chairman, SSS Commodore

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  • Prince of Whales
    replied
    Thanks for that clarification, but I doubt many "Sunday Sailors" bother and If just out for a pleasure sail most would have it turned down so low it would be inaudible.

    Most buoy races the radio is on 68, 69 71 or 72, but I suppose the RC's all have two to 3 radios on and can listen to several channels at once.

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  • psycho tiller
    replied
    I'm just glad RC didn't have an up close and personal crotch strap check this race after the events of "crotch-gate" unfolded after last race.

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  • Andy Newell
    replied
    Originally posted by Prince of Whales View Post
    "The FCC requires by law if you have a VHF radio on your boat, that you MUST monitor channel 16 at all times."

    Maybe if you are a commercial operator.
    That's what I used to think... Pleasure craft are not required to have a radio by law (they are in the SI's) but if a vessel has a radio (they are then a voluntary vessel) and are required by the Code of Federal Regulations to monitor channel 16. Here is our governments way of saying that.

    ยง 80.310 Watch required by voluntary vessels.

    Voluntary vessels not equipped with DSC must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz and on 156.800 MHz (Channel 16) whenever the vessel is underway and the radio is not being used to communicate. Noncommercial vessels, such as recreational boats, may alternatively maintain a watch on 156.450 MHz (Channel 9) in lieu of VHF Channel 16 for call and reply purposes. Voluntary vessels equipped with VHF-DSC equipment must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz and on either 156.525 MHz (Channel 70) or VHF Channel 16 aurally whenever the vessel is underway and the radio is not being used to communicate. Voluntary vessels equipped with MF-HF DSC equipment must have the radio turned on and set to an appropriate DSC distress calling channel or one of the radiotelephone distress channels whenever the vessel is underway and the radio is not being used to communicate. Voluntary vessels equipped with a GMDSS-approved Inmarsat system must have the unit turned on and set to receive calls whenever the vessel is underway and the radio is not being used to communicate.


    It is also just good seamanship. Some think they have a radio in case they need to call for help. I believe we all have radios in case someone else needs our help. That is why OYRA (and others) require fixed radios with mast head antenna (extending range) and in the SI's we require that they be monitored.

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  • Prince of Whales
    replied
    "The FCC requires by law if you have a VHF radio on your boat, that you MUST monitor channel 16 at all times."

    Maybe if you are a commercial operator.

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  • Charlie Tuna
    replied
    If they didn't check in, I don't see how the PRO would feel obligated.

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  • Runs_with_sissors
    replied
    Sounds likes somebody is not happy.

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