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Coastal Cup Departs This Thursday!

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  • #31


    Congratulations to Bloom County, the well worn custom Mancebo 31 owned by Charles James

    (named afterter a now defunct very hilarious comic strip by Bekerley Bretahed http://www.berkeleybreathed.com/)

    They managed to split off from the convergence zone during the start and avoided image capture, yet we had some stock laying about,
    the one above from the Crewed Duxship! Bloom county currently sits in 2nd place in the OYRA PHRO 1 division
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

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    • #32




      Emma and her crew, post Point Conception nose stand incident....some kids have all the fun!
      " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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      • #33
        Looks like someone went swimming!

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        • #34


          The 2010 Coastal Cup Gallery is all complete! Yeah!

          Even found a shot of Bloom County in the progress.....

          Clicky

          Now on to remaining Ditch Run, YRA Sailstice, Opti Heavy Weather, etc...z
          " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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          • #35
            Here is a bit O video from "Ocelot" The first part has some fish to gawk at for the quick after that it was WD on the cam and ADD makes for shitt- videos!!!!!...................this was all before the wind picked up and it got rocking and rolling!!!!




            There will be drinking..........fighting...........and.......... .

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            • #36
              Emma Creighton sends us a mini novel on the Mumm 30 " Cal Maritime's" voyage!

              Thanks Emma!







              Ok- so, Coastal Cup:

              The boys let me drive the start (because I won the rock paper scissors competition- seriously, I'm a world champion) and really, no one wanted to do any upwind driving. We'd discovered right before the start that one person on the boat (to remain nameless) had forgotten his foul weather gear. Interesting. I'd borrowed boots from Jody, which was amazing! Mine are still in Bermuda. Again, interesting.
              Anyway, it was light, I started on the 'wrong' end of the line, which ended up working out just fine as we were on the inside of the left shift all the way out the gate.

              A few tacks later and it was still light, upwind, and awkward, yet somehow we were still passing people. We stayed south-ish, took another hitch out, hoping that the gribs were right and there would be more wind offshore. Eventually we finally turned left and got the A kite up.






              Over the afternoon the wind built (predictably) and we switched to the symmetrical masthead, and then down to a frac kite. The waves were getting bigger and bigger, and steeper. Down below on the Mumm is now officially miserable. I did Mumm '30 worlds in 2008, and it was by far the wettest boat I have ever sailed on. I figured this time would be similar, but that maybe this boat had been a bit waterproofed... Hmmm... I'm not talking damp, I'm talking 5 gallons at a time flushing in through the stringers that the twings are lead through. Oh, and did I mention that we were short one set of foulies? So someone was always down below, with no wet weather gear on.




              Anyway, I still managed to get some sleep (I was wearing smalls, and was able to hang on to them for awhile), so tucking into a sopping sleeping bag wasn't' that bad. Then it's 9PM and time for my watch. It's dark and the breeze has built a lot while I was asleep- it's blowing a solid 25-30 and the waves are seriously steep.

              David Rasmussen was killing it- seriously, so in the groove and cracking jokes the whole time while maintaining 16-19 knots. By this point the boat is so wet, below and on deck that we've renamed it the Volvo '30, and Scott Lynch is singing "We all live in a yellow submarine" almost constantly. I don't even want to try to attempt to swap drivers, so David just hangs in there until it's finally time to take down the kite, put up a jib and jibe over. Apparently we were the closest boat to shore all that night- which is funny. We had a solid 30-35 knots of breeze, and were just aiming to parallel the coast, but I guess some boats took a total flier out while we jibed in. We poled out the jib and were still hitting 18s, easily.



              We went in to San Simeon, then jibed back out, I went to sleep. By now it's totally miserable down below- there are literally phospheresence swimming around on the bench next to me, and I've had to hand over my foulies. Everyone did some serious cuddling down below that night.



              Morning, time to get a kite back up. Frac, then full, as the breeze is seriously down (18-20 knots). Over the morning the breeze builds back up, and then the sun comes out! We're off of Conception, with the full main and masthead kite. Skip and Jody had made me promise we'd reef early, and really, we wanted to, but by this point (it's blowing 30) we just didn't really know how. We'd decided it would be no huge deal to reef on our side, and really, if we tried to reef, we'd end up wiped out anyway. As far as the kite is concerned, well, it's probably time to take it down and put up the frac. All 4 of us are hanging out on the stern, and we talk a bit about getting it down. There's a cruising boat off our stern, really reefed down, just hanging out... probably interested in the kooks that are smashing along, wiping out every few minutes. It's time to get the kite down, so 3 of us go forward- and by forward, I mean, in front of the traveller, and suddenly it's all over. David is driving and he gives some "oh wow!" comment, and when water gets to the mast I turn around and start climbing. It's a bit like Titanic, and when the stern stops rising I turn around just as the boat falls down on to its port side(we'd been on starboard). John Gray is underwater, David is pinned on the lifelines, underwater, and Scott is doggie paddling back towards the boat. We were all clipped in, and we're all still there. The kite is streaming from our rig, the clew has let go so the pole is not broken or anything, and we take minute to have a little bit of a "holy #$%@!" laugh and then we start cleaning things up.



              That seemed like as good a time as any to reef the main, up goes the jib and we start the clean up process. The cruiser boat had jibed over to see if we were still alive, and as soon as they saw us jibe back and hoist a kite they cleared out pretty quickly. Possibly they thought we were certifiable at that point? They must have had a great show though, wish they'd snapped a pic or two of our rudder 15 feet out of the water!



              Down below is really quite something. Everything has been shifted on to the port side of the boat, and things that were in the stern on starboard are now buried forward on port. We are all seriously glad that no one was down below during The Incident.

              The rest of the trip was pretty uneventful and really quite pleasant. Of course every oil rig was directly in our path (and all the boys were perfectly happy making me drive, trying to hang on and get over the top of them), that boat is really awesome to sail with one reef and the masthead kite in 20-25.
              The breeze died and went forward at the end, and I was sent up the rig in the last mile to pull the top main batten that had busted through during our tumble. We were trying really hard to get there in under 32 hours, the pace that was set by the last time that someone sailed that boat in Coastal Cup. We almost made it too.

              Once we finished, everyone in SB was so awesome, even though we had a total fiasco trying to hoist the boat (another story). All in all, the trip was terrifying, miserable, wet, cold and unfortunately enough fun that I'd do it again if I got the chance.

              Now I've got some serious motivation to waterproof the Mini...
              " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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              • #37
                Originally posted by war dog View Post
                Here is a bit O video from "Ocelot" The first part has some fish to gawk at for the quick after that it was WD on the cam and ADD makes for shitt- videos!!!!!...................this was all before the wind picked up and it got rocking and rolling!!!!



                There will be drinking..........fighting...........and.......... .


                Awesomeness.

                Who runs the canting controls on Ocelot and what happens when you round down?

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                • #38
                  Not really

                  Originally posted by Buzz Light Beer View Post
                  Who runs the canting controls on Ocelot and what happens when you round down?
                  No canting on the spotted cat...... just a 4750lbs keel/bulb down to 10ft. Never have rounded down, just wind checks!

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